Saturday, 11 May 2013

Blood Ceremony - The Eldritch Dark (CD Review)


01.Witchwood
02.Goodbye Gemini
03.Lord Summerisle
04.Ballad Of The Weird Sisters
05.The Eldritch Dark
06.Drawing Down The Moon
07.Faunus
08.The Magician


Alia O'Brien (Vocals/Flute/Organ)
Sean Kennedy (Guitar)
Lucas Gadke (Bass)
Michael Carrillo (Drums)

Canadian doom metal band formed in 2006, their "flute tinged witch rock" harking back to late 60's occult band's Coven and the early 70's british band Saturnalia, mixed with the early doom of Black Widow and the folk of Jethro Tull has made them quite unique.

Since the release of their highly acclaimed 2011 album, Living With the Ancients, Blood Ceremony has been recognised as an internationally regarded live act. Having played main support to Ghost on the majorly successful '13 Dates of Doom' US tour, they concluded their debut headline European tour with a sell-out show in London.

After these live performances, Blood Ceremony enclosed themselves within a dank, tomb-like chamber to begin preparations for their third album. After a mind-numbing spell in the analogue womb of Toronto's ProGold Studios, the band is now ready to unveil their newest, and most accomplished, musical offering: The Eldritch Dark.

Recorded and mixed by producer Ian Blurton (Cauldron, Cursed) and mastered by Canadian recording legend Nick Blagona (Deep Purple, Rainbow, Crazy World of Arthur Brown), The Eldritch Dark is a full-length paean to the darker corners of folklore and legend. Containing eight tracks of black magic rock 'n' roll, the album crackles with the excitement of a nocturnal ritual.


Tales of witch-cult gatherings in wooded glens, pacts made in torch-lit abbeys and Victorian magic are accompanied by vintage-style hard rock riffs, snaking bass lines and stirring flute melodies.

The Eldritch Dark also sees the band exploring a more folkier side of their sound; most evident in the hymn-like 'Lord Summerisle' and the murderous early Fairport Convention tinged folk-rock epic 'Ballad Of The Weird Sisters'.

'Goodbye Gemini' is almost psychedelic bringing to mind Jefferson Airplane, similar in style is 'Drawing Down The Moon' where the Doors seem to be jamming with Tony Iommi.
19th century sorcerer, Oliver Haddo, makes a return appearance in the riff-hypnotic album
closer 'The Magician' an 8 minute epic worthy of any Jethro Tull fans attention.


Rating 10/10

For Fans Of : Purson, Black Widow, Jethro Tull, Coven, Fuchsia

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